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Luigi Tenco

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Luigi Tenco
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Luigi Tenco (Cassine, March 21, 1938 - Sanremo, January 27, 1967) was an Italian singer-songwriter, actor, poet, composer and multi-instrumentalist.

Together with De André, Lauzi, Paoli, Bindi, Calabrese, the Reverberi brothers and others, he was one of the exponents of the so-called "Genoese school", a group of artists who deeply renewed Italian light music since the sixties.

He is considered, by most of the critics, one of the greatest and talented Italian singer-songwriters of all time.

His death, which took place at the age of 29 in a Sanremo hotel during the 1967 edition of the Italian Song Festival, was, for a long time, wrapped in a veil of mystery. In 2006 the initial suicide hypothesis was confirmed. Despite this, the real causes of his death have not yet been agreed.

In 1972, at the initiative of Amilcare Rambaldi, the Tenco Club was founded in Sanremo to support the song of an author not only Italian but also international. The Statute states: "The purpose of the Club is to bring together all those who, by collecting the message of Luigi Tenco, propose to enhance the song of the author, also seeking in artistic and poetic realism". The Club operates non-profit, in absolute and recognized autonomy from the music industry.

Over the years it has become the most prestigious body in the sector.

The Tenco Award is a recognition of the career of artists who have made significant contributions to the world's author song.

Tenco was born of an extramarital relationship of her mother, Teresa Zoccola (1906-1977), just separated from her husband and maid by a family of notables very well-to-do in Turin, the Micca family, where she had a relationship with Ferdinando Micca (1921-1983), the sixteen year old son of the same family.
Mother Teresa escaped from Turin still pregnant, to return to Cassine (AL), in the Monferrato, the village where she previously lived, in the house of Corso Garibaldi, 10, where she gave birth to Luigi. The newborn then took the surname of the girl's husband, Giuseppe Tenco, who, however, died before he was born, due to an accident in the barn, on 21 September 1937. The two spouses already had their previous son, Valentino ( he will die in November 1997). Ferdinando Micca in the meantime, had tried to recognize his biological son right away, but his father prevented him. Ferdinand will then marry with another woman, and will no longer have other children. Luigi Tenco spent his early childhood between the villages of Cassine, Maranzana and Ricaldone (the original countries of his mother and grandparents), but he discovered, a few years later, that Giuseppe Tenco was not his real father. The news not only upset the boy, but will cause the removal of the Tenco grandparents (who were unaware of the fact) by the same family of the Zoccola, disinheriting the young Luigi.
#1 - September 02, 2018, 07:43:07 AM
« Last Edit: February 14, 2019, 12:22:12 PM by admin »
 

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Ciao Amore - Luigi Tenco
Ciao Amore - Luigi Tenco



Hello love, hello is a song written by the Italian singer-songwriter Luigi Tenco and interpreted (in separate versions) by the same Tenco and Dalida at the 1967 Sanremo Festival.

The song is sadly known to be inextricably linked to the suicide of Tenco, which took place in Sanremo on January 27, 1967 after the exclusion of the song itself from the end of the Festival

A few years later, in 1971, the song was sung by Dalida in Canzonissima.

The writing of the text of Hello Love, hello had a very long genesis. Before reaching the final version, Tenco, in fact, developed at least a dozen of them, many of which remained unpublished.
The first version, or at least the first of which is known, was elaborated with Sergio Bardotti and was a sort of paraphrase of Bob Dylan's Rainy Day Woman. : it was a text that called for the release of false values ​​[3]. This version, which began with the words "The world turns", would later be engraved by Nicola Di Bari just with that title

Another version, previous to the definitive version, consisted of a text with an antimilitarist character bearing the title I saw it coming back. This version would later be engraved in 1972.

The final text of Ciao amore, hello, compiled - as I said - after I saw them come back, instead it was based on the second version that started with the words "a long white road like salt".
#2 - September 02, 2018, 07:53:19 AM
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« Last Edit: February 14, 2019, 12:22:23 PM by admin »
 

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Yamaha
Se stasera sono qui - Luigi Tenco
Se stasera sono qui - Luigi Tenco



Tenco had written the song in 1966 and had made some auditions, but had never decided to publish it. However, the co-author Mogol managed one evening to drag him into a Milanese studio and convinced him to record a version accompanied only by the piano. After the tragedy of Sanremo, in the archives of Ricordi, the unpublished Tenco test was recovered. Wilma Goich, who had obtained his first success in 1964 just with a song, I realized that I love you, written by Tenco, presented the song to the Disco for the summer of that year, ranking in third place. After the success of the song, the audition of Tenco was completed with an orchestral arrangement by Gian Piero Reverberi and published posthumously on 45 laps and on 33 laps with the eponymous title.
#3 - September 02, 2018, 09:02:06 AM
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« Last Edit: February 14, 2019, 12:22:34 PM by admin »
 

Geno

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Yamaha
Mi sono innamorata di te - Luigi Tenco
Mi sono innamorata di te - Luigi Tenco



I fell in love with you is a song written by singer-songwriter Luigi Tenco, was published in the LP Luigi Tenco of 1962. The piece, with the arrangement of Giampiero Boneschi, was recorded for Ricordi in November 1964 as Lato A in 45 laps Mi I'm in love with you / Angela. In 1969 the song was repeated by Ornella Vanoni in a female version with the title I fell in love with you

"I have fallen in love with you
because I had nothing to do
the day I wanted someone to meet
at night I wanted someone to dream »

(Luigi Tenco)
In this passage love is apparently represented without any romantic illusion and would seem a loophole from boredom [3]. However, in an interview the author stated that, despite these verses in 1962 were interpreted as a blasphemy, in reality this sincere statement contained many truths. Also in the last verses the protagonist is involved in a real feeling and so ... the night goes to look for the woman he loves.

"I have fallen in love with you
and now I do not even know what to do
the day I regret having met you
I come to look for you at night "
#4 - September 02, 2018, 09:43:18 AM
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