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EZ Easy-Play Speed Music Feelings 42

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EZ Easy-Play Speed Music Feelings 42
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#1 - March 12, 2018, 03:32:05 PM

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All I Have To Do Is Dream

All I Have To Do Is Dream
#2 - March 12, 2018, 03:34:11 PM
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Beyond The Sea


Beyond The Sea
#3 - March 12, 2018, 03:35:19 PM
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Chances Are

Chances Are
#4 - March 12, 2018, 03:47:05 PM
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Darn That Dream

Darn That Dream
#5 - March 13, 2018, 09:52:50 AM
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Detroit City


"Detroit City" is a song written by Danny Dill and Mel Tillis, made famous by Billy Grammer (as "I Wanna Go Home"),  country music singer Bobby Bare and Tom Jones.

 Bare's version was released in 1963. The song — sometimes known as "I Wanna Go Home" (from the opening line to the refrain) — was Bare's first Top 10 hit on the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart that summer, and became a country music standard.
#6 - March 13, 2018, 09:54:30 AM
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Feelings


"Feelings" is a 1973 song with lyrics written by Brazilian singer Morris Albert, set to the tune of "Pour Toi" separately composed by Louis “Loulou” Gasté in 1957.

Albert recorded "Feelings" as a single and later included it as the title track of his 1975 debut album. The song's lyrics, recognizable by their "whoa whoa whoa" chorus, concern the singer's inability to "forget my feelings of love". Albert's original recording of the song was very successful, performing well internationally. "Feelings" peaked at #6 on the pop charts and #2 on the Adult Contemporary charts in America.
#7 - March 13, 2018, 12:30:32 PM
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He Don't Love You


"He Don't Love You (Like I Love You)" is a 1975 No. 1 song in the United States sung by Tony Orlando and Dawn. It topped the Billboard Hot 100 chart on May 3, 1975, and remained there for three weeks.  The song also went to No. 1 on the US adult contemporary chart for one week in 1975. It was later certified Gold by the RIAA.

Under its original title "He Will Break Your Heart," the song was also a top-ten hit for one of its songwriters, Jerry Butler, in 1960.
#8 - March 13, 2018, 12:32:16 PM
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If I Didn't Care


"If I Didn't Care" is a song written by Jack Lawrence that was originally sung and recorded by The Ink Spots featuring Bill Kenny in 1939.

The Ink Spots recording became the 10th best selling single of all time with over 19 million copies sold making it one of the fewer than forty all-time singles to have sold 10 million (or more) physical copies worldwide.  According to Lawrence, he mailed the song before showing it to some of his friends.

 His friends' reaction to the song was almost unanimously negative, but he remained positive on it and later it became one of his biggest successes.
#9 - March 14, 2018, 11:36:12 AM
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If You Love Me

If You Love Me

#10 - March 14, 2018, 11:44:00 AM
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It's Not For Me To Say


"It's Not for Me to Say" is a 1957 popular song with music by Robert Allen and lyrics by Al Stillman. It was written for the 1957 movie Lizzie (starring Eleanor Parker), and was sung by Johnny Mathis in the film.

Mathis' recording of the song, arranged by Ray Conniff, was the most successful version, reaching #5 on the Billboard Top 100 singles chart. It became a gold record.
#11 - March 15, 2018, 09:27:49 AM
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Kansas City


Kansas City

#12 - March 15, 2018, 09:30:08 AM
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Let Me Be There


"Let Me Be There" is a popular song written by John Rostill.

 It was first recorded by Olivia Newton-John in 1973 and included on her album of the same name. The country-influenced song was Newton-John's first Top 10 single in the U.S., peaking at No. 6, and also won her a Grammy Award for Best Female Country Vocalist. Mike Sammes sings a bass vocal harmony on the song.
#13 - March 16, 2018, 10:39:44 AM
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Misirlou


"Misirlou" (Greek: Μισιρλού < Turkish: Mısırlı 'Egyptian' < Arabic: مصر‎ Miṣr 'Egypt'[1]) is a traditional song from the Eastern Mediterranean region. The earliest known recording of the song is a 1927 Greek rebetiko / tsifteteli composition influenced by Middle Eastern music. There are also traditional Arabic (belly dancing), Armenian, Persian, Indian, and Turkish versions of the song. This song was very popular from the 1920s in the ethnic Greek and Armenian communities of the Ottoman Empire diaspora who settled in the United States of America.

The song was a hit in 1946 for Jan August, an American pianist and xylophonist nicknamed "the one-man piano duet". It gained worldwide popularity through Dick Dale's 1962 American surf rock version, originally titled "Miserlou", which popularized the song in Western popular culture. Various versions have since been recorded, including other surf and rock versions by bands such as the Beach Boys, the Ventures, Consider the Source, and the Trashmen, as well as international orchestral easy listening (exotica) versions by musicians such as Martin Denny and Arthur Lyman. Dale's surf rock version later gained renewed popularity when director Quentin Tarantino used it in his 1994 film Pulp Fiction, and again when it was sampled in the Black Eyed Peas song "Pump It" (2006). The Martin Denny cover also helped the song resurge in popularity, when it was sampled the Season 2 episode of Mad Men, "The Jet Set". A cover of Dale's surf rock version was included on the Guitar Hero II video game released in 2006.
#14 - March 16, 2018, 10:42:29 AM
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More Today Than Yesterday

More Today Than Yesterday

#15 - March 17, 2018, 12:52:44 PM
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Music To Watch Girls By


"Music to Watch Girls By" was the first Top 40 hit by Bob Crewe using his own name, recorded by his group The Bob Crewe Generation. Crewe first heard the song performed in a jingle demo for a Diet Pepsi commercial. Music was composed by Tony Velona and Sidney "Sid" Ramin. The "big-band, horn driven" recording went to #15 on the pop chart and #2 on the Easy Listening chart.

According to Greg Adams, writing for All Music Guide, the song "exemplified the groovy state of instrumental music at that time." In Bob Crewe's version, a trumpet plays the whole song, the first time around, sounding like Herb Alpert's Tijuana Brass style. The second time the instrumental is played, a half step up in tone from G Minor to A-Flat Minor, a Tenor Saxophone plays a jazzier version, accompanied by strings and a harpsichord, that play a counter-melody. The trumpets finish up the refrain, and all of the parts are played, repeating the first part in the Coda, before the fade.

Other instrumental versions of the song were recorded by Billy Vaughn, Chet Atkins, Al Hirt and Walter Wanderley. A vocal recording by Andy Williams, featuring lyrics written by Tony Velona, went to #34 in the United States, and after it was used in a Fiat ad in the UK, the re-released single reached the top ten. The version by Al Hirt reached #31 on the Adult Contemporary chart and #119 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1967. The Higsons covered the vocal version in 1984; this was released on a single and the album The Curse of the Higsons.
#16 - March 17, 2018, 12:56:40 PM
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Sincerely


"Sincerely" is a popular song written by Harvey Fuqua and Alan Freed and published in 1954.

It was originally recorded by the Moonglows,  for whom it was a number 1 single on the Billboard R&B chart and number 20 on the Billboard Juke Box chart. Fuqua was a member of the Moonglows, and the group was managed by Freed.

The best-selling version was a pop cover recorded by the McGuire Sisters, which entered the charts in 1954 and reached number one the next year. It was eventually certified as a gold record.

In 1988 a rerecording of the song by the country quartet Forester Sisters reached number 8 on the Billboard Hot Country chart.
#17 - March 17, 2018, 01:00:13 PM
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The Candy Man


"The Candy Man" (or alternatively, "The Candy Man Can") is a song that originally appeared in the 1971 film Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory.

 It was written by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley specifically for the film. Although the original book by Roald Dahl (Charlie and the Chocolate Factory) contains lyrics adapted for other songs in the film, the lyrics to "The Candy Man" do not appear in the book.

The soundtrack version of the song was sung by Aubrey Woods, who played Bill the candy store owner in the film.

#18 - March 18, 2018, 10:21:47 PM
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The End Of The World


"The End of the World" is a country pop song written by Arthur Kent and lyricist Sylvia Dee, for American singer Skeeter Davis.

 It had success in the 1960s and spawned many covers.

#19 - March 18, 2018, 10:23:28 PM
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