Create Song Styles

Four Tops

Discussion started on English - F

  • Join Date: Oct 2007
  • Location: Ontario, Canada
  • Country: ca
  • Thanked: 275619 times
Midi
Four Tops
four-tops-live.jpg

Songs Complete sets in this topic From The Four Tops1 = Bernadette

 The Four Tops are an American vocal quartet from Detroit, Michigan who helped to define the city's Motown sound of the 1960s. The group's repertoire has included soul music, R&B, disco, adult contemporary, doo-wop, jazz, and show tunes.

Founded as The Four Aims, lead singer Levi Stubbs, and groupmates Abdul "Duke" Fakir, Renaldo "Obie" Benson and Lawrence Payton remained together for over four decades, having gone from 1953 until 1997 without a change in personnel.

The Four Tops were among a number of groups, including the Miracles, the Marvelettes, Martha and the Vandellas, the Temptations, and the Supremes, who established the Motown Sound around the world during the 1960s. They were notable for having Stubbs, a baritone, as their lead singer, whereas most male/mixed vocal groups of the time were fronted by a tenor.

The group was the main male vocal group for the highly successful songwriting and production team of Holland–Dozier–Holland, who crafted a stream of hit singles on Motown. These included two Billboard Hot 100 number-one hits for the Tops: "I Can't Help Myself (Sugar Pie Honey Bunch)" in 1965 and "Reach Out I'll Be There" in 1966. After Holland-Dozier-Holland left Motown in 1967, the Four Tops were assigned to a number of producers, primarily Frank Wilson, but generally with less success.

When Motown left Detroit in 1972 to move to Los Angeles, California, the Tops stayed in Detroit but signed a new recording deal with ABC Records' Dunhill imprint. Recording mainly in Los Angeles, they continued to have chart singles into the late 1970s, including the million-seller, "Ain't No Woman", their second release on Dunhill, produced by Steve Barri and composers Dennis Lambert and Brian Potter.

In the 1980s, the Four Tops recorded for Casablanca Records, Arista Records and Motown, returning to that label on two occasions for brief stays. Apart from their Indestructible album (owned by Sony Music Entertainment), Universal Music Group controls the rights to their entire post-1963 catalog (through various mergers and acquisitions), as well as their 1956 single, "Could It Be You".

A change of line-up was finally forced upon the group when Lawrence Payton died on June 20, 1997. The group initially continued as a three-piece under the name The Tops,[1] before Theo Peoples (formerly of The Temptations) was recruited as the new fourth member. Peoples eventually took over the role of lead singer when Stubbs suffered a stroke in 2000, with Ronnie McNeir then joining the group. On July 1, 2005, Benson died of lung cancer with Payton's son Roquel Payton replacing him. Levi Stubbs died on October 17, 2008.

Fakir, McNeir, Payton, and Harold "Spike" Bonhart, who replaced Peoples in 2011, are still performing together as the Four Tops. The 2016 Four Tops included Fakir as the only surviving founding member of the original group and Payton as a second-generation member.
#1 - January 11, 2017, 10:21:34 AM
Attachments:
« Last Edit: October 06, 2017, 09:53:38 AM by admin »
 
Wishing you the best day ever followed always by better tomorrows !!

  • Join Date: Oct 2007
  • Location: Ontario, Canada
  • Country: ca
  • Thanked: 275619 times
Yamaha
The Four Tops - Bernadette


"Bernadette" is a 1967 hit song recorded by the Four Tops for the Motown label. The song was written and composed by Holland–Dozier–Holland, Motown's main songwriting team, and produced by Brian Holland and Lamont Dozier.

The song reached #4 on the Billboard Hot 100, and was The Four Tops's final Top 10 hit of the 1960s.  On the soul chart, "Bernadette" went to number three. It also reached #8 in the UK on its first release and was a hit again in 1972, reaching #23.

The song is notable for its false ending, where the instruments drop out and the background singers hold a chord. The lead singer then shouts "Bernadette" and the song resumes, ending in a fade-out. Critic Maury Dean described the effectiveness of Stubb's shout of "BERNADETTE!!!" as being the key ingredient in getting listeners to buy the record, even if Bernadette herself may not have heard him.

Allmusic critic John Bush calls it "dramatic" and "impassioned."

#2 - January 11, 2017, 10:23:19 AM
Attachments:
« Last Edit: June 20, 2017, 07:18:57 PM by admin »
 
Wishing you the best day ever followed always by better tomorrows !!

New!
Yamaha
The Four Tops - Can't Help Myself


"I Can't Help Myself (Sugar Pie Honey Bunch)" is a 1965 hit song recorded by the Four Tops for the Motown label.

Written and produced by Motown's main production team Holland–Dozier–Holland, the song is one of the most well-known Motown tunes of the 1960s. The song reached number one on the R&B charts and was also the number-one song on the Billboard Hot 100 for two non-consecutive weeks, from June 12 to June 19 and from June 26 to July 3 in 1965.

It replaced "Back in My Arms Again" by labelmates The Supremes, was first replaced by "Mr. Tambourine Man" by The Byrds, then regained the top spot before being replaced by "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" by The Rolling Stones. Billboard ranked the record as the No. 2 song of 1965. It was also the Four Tops first Top 40 single in the UK, reaching #23 on its original release, and a 1970 reissue peaked at #10 in the UK charts.

The song finds lead singer Levi Stubbs, assisted by the other three Tops and The Andantes, pleadingly professing his love to a woman: "Sugar pie, honey bunch/I'm weaker than a man should be!/Can't help myself/I'm a fool in love, you see." Like most of his lead parts, Stubbs' vocals are recorded in a tone that straddles the line between singing and shouting, similar to the tone of a black Baptist preacher.

The melodic and chordal progressions are very similar to the Supremes' "Where Did Our Love Go". Allmusic critic Ed Hogan claims that the song uses the same chords as The Supremes' 1964 hit "Where Did Our Love Go," also written by Holland-Dozier-Holland.

Rolling Stone magazine ranked the song #415 on their list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. It has been covered extensively since 1965, including versions done for several television commercials.
#3 - June 20, 2017, 07:21:36 PM
Attachments:
« Last Edit: July 12, 2018, 06:36:33 PM by musicman100 »
 
Wishing you the best day ever followed always by better tomorrows !!

New!
Yamaha
The Four Tops - Reach Out


"Reach Out I'll Be There" (also formatted as "Reach Out (I'll Be There)") is a 1966 song recorded by the Four Tops for the Motown label. Written and produced by Motown's main production team, Holland–Dozier–Holland,  the song is one of the best known Motown tunes of the 1960s, and is today considered The Tops' signature song.

It was the number one song on the Rhythm & Blues charts for two weeks,[3] and on the Billboard Hot 100 for two weeks, from October 15–22, 1966. It replaced "Cherish" by The Association, and was itself replaced by "96 Tears" by Question Mark & the Mysterians. The track also reached number one in the UK Singles Chart, becoming Motown's second UK chart-topper after The Supremes' 1964 release "Baby Love".  It replaced Jim Reeves' "Distant Drums" at number one in October 1966, and stayed there for three weeks before being replaced by The Beach Boys' "Good Vibrations" in November.

Rolling Stone later ranked this version number 206 on its list of "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time". Billboard ranked the record as the number four song for 1966.  This version is also currently ranked as the 56th best song of all time (as well as the number four song of 1966) in an aggregation of critics' lists at Acclaimed Music.
#4 - July 09, 2017, 03:38:50 PM
Attachments:
« Last Edit: October 06, 2017, 10:11:52 AM by admin »
 
The following users thanked this post: wersi, astor, larrylstauffer, mistypus, tony2004, emmydogcdx, Annismusik
Wishing you the best day ever followed always by better tomorrows !!

Yamaha
Four Tops - Loco In Acapulco


"Loco in Acapulco" was a 1988 hit song by the Four Tops. It was written and produced by Phil Collins (who also played drums) and Lamont Dozier (one third of the group's legendary Motown long-time songwriting team, Holland–Dozier–Holland), for the soundtrack to the film Buster, that also starred Phil Collins in the title role.

It was released on Arista Records and was an international hit, reaching number 7 in the United Kingdom charts, and number 9 in the Netherlands. The song did not chart in the U.S., as it was issued as the B-Side to "Change Of Heart", when it was released as a single in the US during 1989. The song is about partying and having fun in the Mexican city of Acapulco. The song would subsequently appear on their 1988 studio album Indestructible.
#5 - October 06, 2017, 09:56:13 AM
Attachments:
 
The following users thanked this post: tony2004
Wishing you the best day ever followed always by better tomorrows !!

Print

Members:

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.


There was an error while thanking
Thanking...